Behaviorally Informed Interventions

The Importance of Behavior Science

As the numbers of vaccine preventable disease outbreaks increases globally, and questions arise about changing trends in public confidence in the safety and effectiveness of vaccinations, there is a renewed emphasis to understand and intervene on factors associated with low community demand for vaccination. 

Strengthening demand for vaccinations in LMIC requires leveraging insights and learnings from the behavioral and social sciences to inform interventions that aim to understand and change individual and community behavior in order to increase vaccination uptake.     

There are many opportunities to leverage evidence-based behavior change strategies from multi-disciplinary fields to change vaccination behavior and increase vaccination uptake.  Our aim is to advance understanding of what effective, evidence-based interventions and behavioral insights within vaccination science can increase demand for vaccination.



Our Workstream Objective


Sub-Objectives

  1. Identify an evidence-based, practitioner-friendly model of behavior change that explains immunization uptake, demand for immunization, and other preventive health behaviors (complementary to the caregiver journey as an operating model)
  2. Develop a research / learning agenda to direct the development and testing of behavior change interventions for immunization
  3. Develop a practical, practitioner-friendly repository of evidence-based interventions and learnings to improve demand for immunization and increase immunization uptake, with emphasis on costing
  4. Develop guidance and tools to facilitate the implementation of tested approaches for broader use by global/regional/country policymakers and practitioners
  5. Use iterative approaches to support testing of evidence-based interventions in LMICs for wider application and scale-up
  6. Develop and engage with a broader Community of Practice of behavior and social change practitioners to inform the development, adaptation, translation and testing of a practitioner-friendly model of behavioral and social change and a learning agenda
  7. Ensure that workstream products (models of behavior change, repository of intervention) are responsive to and feed into larger immunization programming needs such as reaching zero-dose children, addressing gender barriers, reaching hard to reach populations, and increasing equity

There are many opportunities to leverage evidence-based behavior change strategies from multi-disciplinary fields to change vaccination behavior and increase vaccination uptake.


Our Current Initiatives